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33 Revolutions per Minute A History of Protest Songs, from Billie Holiday to Green Day
Anatomy of a Song The Oral History of 45 Iconic Hits That Changed Rock, R&B and Pop
The Denver Folk Music Tradition
Encyclopedia of Rap and Hip Hop Culture
Girls Like Us Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon--And the Journey of a Generation
The History of Rock & Roll, Volume 1 1920-1963
Led Zeppelin Crashed Here The Rock and Roll Landmarks of North America
Legends, Icons & Rebels Music That Changed the World
Out of the Vinyl Deeps Ellen Willis on Rock Music
Ready For a Brand New Beat How Dancing in the Street Became the Anthem for a Changing America
Red Rocks The Concert Years
Smithsonian Rock and Roll Live and Unseen
Sticky Fingers The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone Magazine
Uncommon People The Rise and Fall of The Rock Stars
The Wrecking Crew The Inside Story of Rock and Roll's Best-Kept Secret
33 Revolutions per Minute: A History of Protest Songs, from Billie Holiday to Green Day / Dorian Lynskey

Nowhere does pop music collide more dramatically with the wider world than in the protest song, which forces its way into the news and prompts conversations from Washington to Westminster. Rather than being merely a worthy adjunct to the business of pop, protest music is woven into its DNA. When you listen to Bob Dylan, Stevie Wonder, Public Enemy, or the Clash, you are not sitting down to a dusty seminar; you are hearing pop music at its most thrillingly alive.

33 Revolutions Per Minute is the story of protest music told in 33 songs. An incisive history of a wide and shape-shifting genre, Dorian Lynskey's authoritative book takes us from the days of Billie Holliday crooning "Strange Fruit" before shocked audiences to Vietnam-era crowds voicing their resentment at the sounds of Bob Dylan to the fracas over the Dixie Chicks' comments against George W. Bush during the Iraq War.

Anatomy of a Song: The Oral History of 45 Iconic Hits That Changed Rock, R&B and Pop / Marc Myers

Every great song has a story that needs to be told. Writer and music historian Marc Myers brings to life five decades of music through forty-five transformative songs and oral-history interviews with the artists who created them. Bringing readers inside the making of a hit, Anatomy of a Song includes the Isley Brothers' memorable song "Shout," Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love," Janis Joplin's "Mercedes Benz," and R.E.M's "Losing My Religion." After receiving his discharge from the army in 1968, John Fogerty does a handstand and reworks Beethoven's Fifth Symphony to come up with "Proud Mary." Joni Mitchell remembers living in a cave on Crete with the "mean old daddy" who inspired her 1971 hit "Carey."

The Denver Folk Music Tradition / Paul A Malkoski

In 1962, Harry Tuft founded the Denver Folklore Center to bring together contemporary folk music fans and performers such as Joan Baez, Pete Seeger, Judy Collins and so many more. In the following decade, a core of folk enthusiasts established the Swallow Hill Music Association.
These two organizations have persevered to sustain a lasting folk legacy in the Mile High City. This is the story of how the music and the people who love and live it shaped a unique, influential tradition. Join local historian and musician Paul Malkoski on a tour through more than fifty years of Denver's proud folk music scene.

Encyclopedia of Rap and Hip Hop Culture / Yvonne Bynoe

Hip Hop music is comprised of several art forms: 1) MC-ing or rapping 2) B-boying or breakdancing 3) Deejaying (music) and 4) Graffiti art (visual art) . This encyclopedia examines all four elements of Hip Hop Culture, providing students, scholars, and music fans with a complete history of the thirty-year music genre. Tracing its early roots from black DJs talking over music in the 1960s, the B-boy dancers in the 1970s, and the scratching and sampling techniques of the '80s to the founding of Def Jam productions, the current East Cost-West Coast rivalry, and superstars such as Eminem and 50 Cent, hip hop fans will find this an indispensable resource.

Girls Like Us: Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon--And the Journey of a Generation / Sheila Weller

Joni Mitchell, Carole King, and Carly Simon remain among the most enduring and important women in popular music. Each woman is distinct: King is the product of outer-borough, middle-class New York City; Mitchell is a granddaughter of Canadian farmers; and Simon is a child of the Manhattan intellectual upper crust. They collectively represent, in their lives and their songs, a great swath of American girls who came of age in the late 1960s. Their stories trace the arc of the now-mythic generation known as "the sixties" - the female version - but in a bracingly specific and deeply recalled way, far from clich??. The history of the women of that generation had never been written - until now - and it is told through the resonant lives and emblematic songs of Mitchell, Simon, and King. Filled with the voices of many dozens of these women's intimates, this alternating biography reads like a novel - except it's all true, and the heroines are famous and beloved. Sheila Weller captures the character of each woman and gives a balanced portrayal enriched by a wealth of new information. Girls Like Us is an epic treatment of midcentury women who dared to break tradition and become what none had been before them - confessors in song, rock superstars, and adventurers of heart and soul.

The History of Rock & Roll, Volume 1: 1920-1963 / Ed Ward

Ed Ward covers the first half of the history of rock & roll in this sweeping and definitive narrative -- from the 1920s, when the music of rambling medicine shows mingled with the songs of vaudeville and minstrel acts to create the very early sounds of country and rhythm and blues, to the rise of the first independent record labels post-World War II, and concluding in December 1963, just as an immense change in the airwaves took hold and the Beatles prepared for their first American tour. The History of Rock & Roll, Volume 1 shines a light on the far corners of the genre to reveal the stories behind the hugely influential artists who changed the musical landscape forever.

Led Zeppelin Crashed Here: The Rock and Roll Landmarks of North America / Chris Epting

Journey through America?s rich rock 'n' roll history with the musical landmarks detailed in this extensive collection. Nearly 600 locations, including birthplaces, concert locales, hotel rooms, and graves, are neatly compiled and paired with historical tidbits, trivia, photographs, and backstage lore?from the site where Elvis got his first guitar and Buddy Holly?s plane crashed to Sid and Nancy?s hotel room and the infamous ?Riot House? on the Sunset Strip. The rowdiest and the most talented rockers are all featured, with sidebars on musical greats like Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones, and U2. Learn the locations of the secret rehearsal for David Bowie?s Diamond Dogs album, the club where the Sex Pistols played their first and last concert. Chris Epting includes record stores, road trip music suggestions, and other rock 'n' roll miscellany.

Legends, Icons & Rebels: Music That Changed the World / Robbie Robertson

Part memoir, part tribute, and all great storytelling ...
Music industry veterans Robbie Robertson, Jim Guerinot, Jared Levine, and Sebastian Robertson invite young readers to share with them in celebrating twenty-seven musical legends. Short profiles chronicle personal stories and achievements of extraordinarily talented artists whose innovations changed the landscape of music for generations to come. Carefully compiled like any great playlist, the line-up features originators, rebels, and risk-takers across diverse genres. From Ray Charles to Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry to Bob Dylan, Robertson shares anecdotes about these artists and the influence they had on his own musical journey.

Out of the Vinyl Deeps: Ellen Willis on Rock Music / Nona Willis Aronowitz

In 1968, the?New Yorker?hired Ellen Willis as its first popular music critic. Her column, Rock, Etc., ran for seven years and established Willis as a leader in cultural commentary and a pioneer in the nascent and otherwise male-dominated field of rock criticism. As a writer for a magazine with a circulation of nearly half a million, Willis was also the country's most widely read rock critic. With a voice at once sharp, thoughtful, and ecstatic, she covered a wide range of artists-Bob Dylan, The Who, Van Morrison, Elvis Presley, David Bowie, the Rolling Stones, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Joni Mitchell, the Velvet Underground, Sam and Dave, Bruce Springsteen, and Stevie Wonder-assessing their albums and performances not only on their originality, musicianship, and cultural impact but also in terms of how they made her feel.

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In 1968, the?New Yorker?hired Ellen Willis as its first popular music critic. Her column, Rock, Etc., ran for seven years and established Willis as a leader in cultural commentary and a pioneer in the nascent and otherwise male-dominated field of rock criticism. As a writer for a magazine with a circulation of nearly half a million, Willis was also the country's most widely read rock critic. With a voice at once sharp, thoughtful, and ecstatic, she covered a wide range of artists-Bob Dylan, The Who, Van Morrison, Elvis Presley, David Bowie, the Rolling Stones, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Joni Mitchell, the Velvet Underground, Sam and Dave, Bruce Springsteen, and Stevie Wonder-assessing their albums and performances not only on their originality, musicianship, and cultural impact but also in terms of how they made her feel.

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Ready For a Brand New Beat: How "Dancing in the Street" Became the Anthem for a Changing America / Mark Kurlansky

Can a song change a nation? In 1964, Marvin Gaye, record producer William "Mickey" Stevenson, and Motown songwriter Ivy Jo Hunter wrote "Dancing in the Street." The song was recorded at Motown's Hitsville USA Studio by Martha and the Vandellas, with lead singer Martha Reeves arranging her own vocals. Released on July 31, the song was supposed to be an upbeat dance recording - a precursor to disco, and a song about the joyousness of dance. But events overtook it, and the song became one of the icons of American pop culture.

Red Rocks: The Concert Years / G Brown

In 1906, Denver's Pietro Satriano and his 25-piece brass band became the first musical act to perform at Red Rocks Amphitheatre, then christened the Garden of the Titans. Over a century later, Denver is a must-stop for every nationally touring act, and Red Rocks, set deep into the towering red rocks of Morrison, Colorado, is heralded as America's most important outdoor music venue. From the Grateful Dead to Willie Nelson, every star in the musical galaxy has aspired to play on this special and magical stage.


Red Rocks: The Concert Years presents a comprehensive history of what came to be considered one of the Natural Wonders of the World, thanks to the combination of natural aesthetics and acoustics, as impressive to the eyes as to the ears. Colorado Music Hall of Fame director and author G. Brown presents over 200 interviews with an array of performers, from the late Jerry Garcia and Dave Matthews to Bono and Paul McCartney, as well as the most detailed accounts to date of the legendary Beatles show in 1964, Bruce Springsteen's first outdoor concert ever in 1978, and U2's career-making 1983 video shoot.
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Smithsonian Rock and Roll: Live and Unseen / Bill Bentley

In December 2015, the Smithsonian called on rock and roll lovers around the world to collect photos and stories of their favorite moments in music. Fans dug through attics, basements, closets, shoeboxes, digital cameras, and photo albums to post great rock shots to rockandroll.si.edu. From Woodstock to the Whisky a Go Go, from Lollapalooza to the 9:30 Club, and all the rockin' places in between, fans overwhelmingly responded with their favorite rock and roll moments. Iconic artists ranging from the Who to Nirvana to Chuck Berry to the Jimi Hendrix and many more are celebrated here. There are early photographs of everyone from Run-D.M.C. to the Runaways, and contemporary shots of some of the biggest names in music, including Bruce Springsteen, the Rolling Stones, and Metallica. Presented together, these photographs create a kaleidoscopic history of the artists, the musical styles, the venues, the concerts, and the fans. This is rock and roll as it has never been seen before.

Sticky Fingers: The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone Magazine / Joe Hagan

Lennon. Dylan. Jagger. Belushi. Leibovitz. The story of Jann Wenner, Rolling Stone's founder, editor, and publisher, is an insider's trip through the backstages of storied concert venues, rock-star hotel rooms, and the political ups and downs of the latter half of the Twentieth Century, right up through the digital age: connecting the counterculture of Haight Ashbury to the "straight world."

Supplemented by a cache of extraordinary documents and letters from Wenner's personal archives, Sticky Fingers is the story of a mercurial, wide-eyed rock and roll fan of ambiguous sexuality but unambiguous ambition who reinvents youth culture, marketing the libertine world of the late sixties counterculture in a stylish, glossy package that would stand for decades as a testament to the cultural power of American youth. Joe Hagan captures in stunning detail the extraordinary lives constellated around a magazine that began as a scrappy rebellion and became a locus of power, influence, and access--using hundreds of hours of reporting and exclusive interviews.

Uncommon People: The Rise and Fall of The Rock Stars / DAVID HEPWORTH

The age of the rock star, like the age of the cowboy, has passed. Like the cowboy, the idea of the rock star lives on in our imaginations. What did we see in them? Swagger. Recklessness. Sexual charisma. Damn-the-torpedoes self-belief. A certain way of carrying themselves. Good hair. Interesting shoes. Talent we wished we had. What did we want of them? To be larger than life but also like us. To live out their songs. To stay young forever. No wonder many didn't stay the course.

In Uncommon People, David Hepworth zeroes in on defining moments and turning points in the lives of forty rock stars from 1955 to 1995, taking us on a journey to burst a hundred myths and create a hundred more.

The Wrecking Crew: The Inside Story of Rock and Roll's Best-Kept Secret / Kent Hartman

If you were a fan of popular music in the 1960s and early '70s, you were a fan of the Wrecking Crew-whether you knew it or not.

On hit record after hit record by everyone from the Byrds, the Beach Boys, and the Monkees to the Grass Roots, the 5th Dimension, Sonny & Cher, and Simon & Garfunkel, this collection of West Coast studio musicians from diverse backgrounds established themselves in Los Angeles, California as the driving sound of pop music-sometimes over the objection of actual band members forced to make way for Wrecking Crew members. Industry insider Kent Hartman tells the dramatic, definitive story of the musicians who forged a reputation throughout the business as the secret weapons behind the top recording stars.

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