Skip Navigation
My Account
Locations
What's New
Research
Download
How do I?

Nonfiction to Read this Summer

Readers' Cafe

Book Jacket for Also a Poet Frank O'Hara, My Father, and Me
Book Jacket for Body Language Writers on Identity, Physicality, and Making Space for Ourselves
Book Jacket for The Crane Wife A Memoir in Essays
Book Jacket for Crying in the Bathroom A Memoir
Book Jacket for Deer Creek Drive A Reckoning of Memory and Murder in the Mississippi Delta
Book Jacket for Diary of a Misfit A Memoir and a Mystery
Book Jacket for  Did Ye Hear Mammy Died A Memoir
Book Jacket for An Immense World How Animal Senses Reveal the Hidden Realms Around Us
Book Jacket for Koshersoul
Book Jacket for The Man Who Could Move Clouds A Memoir
Book Jacket for Rogues True Stories of Grifters, Killers, Rebels and Crooks
Book Jacket for Shadowlands A Journey Through Britain's Lost Cities and Vanished Villages
Book Jacket for The Stolen Year How COVID Changed Children's Lives, and Where We Go Now
Book Jacket for We Carry Their Bones The Search for Justice at the Dozier School for Boys
Book Jacket for The World As We Knew It Dispatches From a Changing Climate
Book Jacket for Why Didn't You Tell Me A Memoir

Also a Poet: Frank O'Hara, My Father, and Me / Ada Calhoun

A staggering memoir from New York Times-bestselling author Ada Calhoun tracing her fraught relationship with her father and their shared obsession with a great poetWhen Ada Calhoun stumbled upon old cassette tapes of interviews her father, celebrated art critic Peter Schjeldahl, had conducted for his never-completed biography of poet Frank O'Hara, she set out to finish the book her father had started forty years earlier.?As a lifelong O'Hara fan who grew up amid his bohemian cohort in the East Village, Calhoun thought the project would be easy, even fun, but the deeper she dove, the more she had to face not just O'Hara's past, but also her father's, and her own.?The result is a groundbreaking and kaleidoscopic memoir that weaves compelling literary history with a moving, honest, and tender story of a complicated father-daughter bond.

Body Language: Writers on Identity, Physicality, and Making Space for Ourselves / Nicole Chung

A kaleidoscopic anthology of essays published by Catapult magazine about the stories our bodies tell, and how we move within - and against - expectations of race, gender, health, and abilityBodies are serious, irreverent, sexy, fragile, strong, political, and inseparable from our experiences and identities as human beings. Pushing the dialogue and confronting monolithic myths, this collection of essays tackles topics like weight, disability, desire, fertility, illness, and the embodied experience of race in deep, challenging ways. Selected from the archives of Catapult magazine, the essays in Body Language affirm and challenge the personal and political conversations around human bodies from the perspectives of thirty writers diverse in race, age, gender, size, sexuality, health, ability, geography, and class - a brilliant group probing and speaking their own truths about their bodies and identities, refusing to submit to others' expectations about how their bodies should look, function, and behave.

The Crane Wife: A Memoir in Essays / C J HAUSER

A Time Most Anticipated Book of 2022 * CJ Hauser expands on her viral sensation "The Crane Wife" with seventeen further essays in this intimate, frank, and funny book about love in the twenty-first centuryTen days after calling off her wedding, CJ Hauser went on an expedition to Texas to study the whooping crane. After a week wading through the gulf, she realized she'd almost signed up to live someone else's life. In this intimate, frank, and funny memoir-in-essays, Hauser releases herself from traditional narratives of happiness and goes looking for ways of living that leave room for the unexpected, making plenty of mistakes along the way. She kisses Internet strangers and officiates at a wedding. She rereads Rebecca in the house her boyfriend once shared with his ex-wife and rewinds Katharine Hepburn in The Philadelphia Story to learn how not to lose yourself in a relationship.

Crying in the Bathroom: A Memoir / Erika L Sa?nchez

From the New York Times best-selling author of I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter, an utterly original memoir-in-essays that is as deeply moving as it is hilarious Growing up as the daughter of Mexican immigrants in Chicago in the nineties, Erika S?nchez was a self-described pariah, misfit, and disappointment - a foul-mouthed, melancholic rabble-rouser who painted her nails black but also loved comedy, often laughing so hard with her friends that she had to leave her school classroom. Twenty-five years later, she's now an award-winning novelist, poet, and essayist, but she's still got an irrepressible laugh, an acerbic wit, and singular powers of perception about the world around her. In these essays, S?nchez writes about everything from sex to white feminism to debilitating depression, revealing an interior life rich with ideas, self-awareness, and perception.

Deer Creek Drive: A Reckoning of Memory and Murder in the Mississippi Delta / Beverly Lowry

The stunning chronicle of a murder that rocked the Mississippi Delta and forever shaped one author's life and perception of home.In 1948, in the most stubbornly Dixiefied corner of the Jim Crow south, society matron Idella Thompson was viciously murdered in her own home: stabbed at least 150 times and left facedown in one of the bathrooms. Her daughter, Ruth Dickins, was the only other person in the house. She told authorities a Black man she didn't recognize had fled the scene, but no evidence of the man's presence was uncovered. When Dickins herself was convicted and sentenced to life in prison, the community exploded. Petitions pleading for her release were drafted, signed, and circulated, and after only six years, the governor of Mississippi granted Ruth Dickins an indefinite suspension of her sentence and she was set free.

Diary of a Misfit: A Memoir and a Mystery / Casey Parks

Part memoir, part investigative reporting, Diary of a Misfit is a sweeping journalistic saga about sexuality and gender, family trauma and the redemptive force of love.? ?When Casey Parks came out as a lesbian in college back in 2002, she assumed her life in the South was over. Her mother shunned her, and her pastor asked God to kill her. But then Parks's grandmother, a stern conservative who grew up picking cotton, pulled her aside and revealed a startling secret. "I grew up across the street from a woman who lived as a man," and then implored Casey to find out what happened to him. Diary of a Misfit is the story of Parks's life-changing journey to unravel the mystery of Roy Hudgins, the small-town country singer from grandmother's youth, all the while confronting ghosts of her own.

Did Ye Hear Mammy Died?: A Memoir / Seamas O'Reilly

This heartwarming and hilarious family memoir shares what life was like growing up as one of eleven siblings raised by a single dad in Northern Ireland at the end of the Troubles.After the untimely death of his mother, five-year old Seamas and his ten (TEN!) siblings were left to the care of their loving but understandably beleaguered father. In this thoroughly delightful memoir, we follow Seamas and the rest of his rowdy clan as they learn to cook, clean, do the laundry, and struggle (often hilariously) to keep the household running smoothly and turn into adults in the absence of the woman who had held them together. Along the way, we see Seamas through various adventures: There's the time the family's windows were blown out by an IRA bomb; the time a priest blessed their thirteen-seater caravan before they took off for a holiday on which they narrowly escaped death; the time Seamas worked as a guide in a leprechaun museum during the recession; and of course, the time he inadvertently found himself on ketamine while serving drinks to the President of Ireland.

An Immense World: How Animal Senses Reveal the Hidden Realms Around Us / Ed Yong

A grand tour through the hidden realms of animal senses that will transform the way you perceive the world - from the Pulitzer Prize-winning, New York Times bestselling author of I Contain Multitudes.The Earth teems with sights and textures, sounds and vibrations, smells and tastes, electric and magnetic fields. But every animal is enclosed within its own unique sensory bubble, perceiving but a tiny sliver of an immense world. This book welcomes us into a previously unfathomable dimension - the world as it is truly perceived by other animals.We encounter beetles that are drawn to fires, turtles that can track the Earth's magnetic fields, fish that fill rivers with electrical messages, and humans that wield sonar like bats.We discover that a crocodile's scaly face is as sensitive as a lover's fingertips, that the eyes of a giant squid evolved to see sparkling whales, that plants thrum with the inaudible songs of courting bugs, and that even simple scallops have complex vision.

Koshersoul / Michael Twitty

The James Beard award-winning author of the acclaimed The Cooking Gene explores the cultural crossroads of Jewish and African diaspora cuisine and issues of memory, identity, and food.In Koshersoul, Michael W. Twitty considers the marriage of two of the most distinctive culinary cultures in the world today: the foods and traditions of the African Atlantic and the global Jewish diaspora. To Twitty, the creation of African-Jewish cooking is a conversation of migrations and a dialogue of diasporas offering a rich background for inventive recipes and the people who create them. The question that most intrigues him is not just who makes the food, but how the food makes the people. Jews of Color are not outliers, Twitty contends, but significant and meaningful cultural creators in both Black and Jewish civilizations.

The Man Who Could Move Clouds: A Memoir / Ingrid Rojas Contreras

From the author of the "original, politically daring and passionately written" (Vogue) novel Fruit of the Drunken Tree, comes a dazzling, kaleidoscopic memoir reclaiming her family's otherworldly legacy.For Ingrid Rojas Contreras, magic runs in the family. Raised amid the political violence of 1980s and '90s Colombia, in a house bustling with her mother's fortune-telling clients, she was a hard child to surprise. Her maternal grandfather, Nono, was a renowned curandero, a community healer gifted with what the family called "the secrets": the power to talk to the dead, tell the future, treat the sick, and move the clouds. And as the first woman to inherit "the secrets," Rojas Contreras' mother was just as powerful. Mami delighted in her ability to appear in two places at once, and she could cast out even the most persistent spirits with nothing more than a glass of water.

Rogues: True Stories of Grifters, Killers, Rebels and Crooks / Patrick Radden Keefe

From the prize-winning, New York Times bestselling author of Empire of Pain and Say Nothing - and one of the most decorated journalists of our time - twelve enthralling stories of skulduggery and intrigue"I read everything he writes. Every time he writes a book, I read it. Every time he writes an article, I read it ... he's a national treasure." - Rachel Maddow?Patrick Radden Keefe has garnered prizes ranging from the National Magazine Award to the Orwell Prize to the National Book Critics Circle Award for his meticulously-reported, hypnotically-engaging work on the many ways people behave badly. Rogues brings together a dozen of his most celebrated articles from The New Yorker. As Keefe says in his preface "They reflect on some of my abiding preoccupations: crime and corruption, secrets and lies, the permeable membrane separating licit and illicit worlds, the bonds of family, the power of denial.

Shadowlands: A Journey Through Britain's Lost Cities and Vanished Villages / MATTHEW GREEN

A "brilliant London historian" (BBC Radio) tells the story of Britain as never before -- through its abandoned villages and towns.Drowned. Buried by sand. Decimated by plague. Plunged off a cliff. This is the extraordinary tale of Britain's eerie and remarkable ghost towns and villages; shadowlands that once hummed with life. Peering through the cracks of history, we find Dunwich, a medieval city plunged off a cliff by sea storms; the abandoned village of Wharram Percy, wiped out by the Black Death; the lost city of Trellech unearthed by moles in 2002; and a Norfolk village zombified by the military and turned into a Nazi, Soviet, and Afghan village for training.Matthew Green, a British historian and broadcaster, tells the astonishing tales of the rise and demise of these places, animating the people who lived, worked, dreamed, and died there.

The Stolen Year: How COVID Changed Children's Lives, and Where We Go Now / Anya Kamenetz

An NPR education reporter shows how the pandemic disrupted children's lives - and how our country has nearly always failed to put our children first The onset of COVID broke a 150-year social contract between America and its children. Tens of millions of students lost what little support they had from the government - not just school but food, heat, and physical and emotional safety. The cost was enormous. But this crisis began much earlier than 2020. In The Stolen Year, Anya Kamenetz exposes a long-running indifference to the plight of children and families in American life and calls for a reckoning. She follows families across the country as they live through the pandemic, facing loss and resilience: a boy with autism in San Francisco who gains a foster brother and a Hispanic family in Texas that loses a member to COVID, and finds solace when they need it most.

We Carry Their Bones: The Search for Justice at the Dozier School for Boys / Erin Kimmerle

"With We Carry Their Bones, Erin Kimmerle continues to unearth the true story of the Dozier School, a tale more frightening than any fiction. In a corrupt world, her unflinching revelations are as close as we'll come to justice." -Colson Whitehead, Pulitzer-Prize Winning

The World As We Knew It: Dispatches From a Changing Climate / Amy Brady

Nineteen leading literary writers from around the globe offer timely, haunting first-person reflections on how climate change has altered their lives - including essays by Lydia Millet, Alexandra Kleeman, Kim Stanley Robinson, Omar El Akkad, Lidia Yuknavitch, Melissa Febos, and more.In this riveting anthology, leading literary writers reflect on how climate change has altered their lives, revealing the personal and haunting consequences of this global threat.??In the opening essay, National Book Award finalist Lydia Millet mourns the end of the Saguaro cacti in her Arizona backyard due to drought. Later, Omar El Akkad contemplates how the rise of temperatures in the Middle East?is destroying his home and the wellspring of his art. Gabrielle Bellot reflects on how a bizarre lionfish invasion devastated the coral reef near her home in the Caribbean - a precursor to even stranger events to come.

Why Didn't You Tell Me?: A Memoir / Carmen Rita Wong

An immigrant mother's long-held secrets upend her daughter's understanding of her family, her identity, and her place in the world in this powerful and dramatic memoir"This is the Carmen Rita Wong I know - fierce and true. Her story broke my heart and filled it up at the same time." - Sunny Hostin, three-time Emmy Award-winning co-host of ABC's The View and New York Times bestselling author of I Am These TruthsMy mother carried a powerful secret. A secret that shaped my life and the lives of everyone around me in ways she could not have imagined. Carmen Rita Wong has always craved a sense of belonging: First as a toddler in a warm room full of Black and brown Latina women, like her mother, Lupe, cheering her dancing during her childhood in Harlem.

My Account Library Locations What's New Research Download How do I? Events Kids Teens Espanol - Spanish site
Prospector FRCC
Facebook Twitter River's Mouth Blog Instagram Pininterest LinkedIn Flickr You Tube


Poudre River Public Library District (970) 221-6740
Including the collection of Front Range Community College, Larimer Campus


Poudre River Public Library District
(970) 221-6740

Including the collection of
Front Range Community College, Larimer Campus